M I N U T E S
CITY COUNCIL MEETING - COLUMBIA, MISSOURI
SEPTEMBER 20, 1999
 

INTRODUCTION
The City Council of the City of Columbia, Missouri met for a regular meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, September 20, 1999, in the Council Chamber of the City of Columbia, Missouri. The roll was taken with the following results: Council Members COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, and JOHN were present. The City Manager, City Counselor, City Clerk, and various Department Heads were also present.

APPROVAL OF MINUTES
The minutes of the regular meeting of September 7, 1999, were approved unanimously by voice vote on a motion made by Mr. Campbell and a second by Mr. Janku.

APPROVAL AND ADJUSTMENT OF AGENDA INCLUDING CONSENT AGENDA
Mayor Hindman noted that Report E would be added to the agenda. In addition, R182-99 would be moved from the Consent Agenda to New Business.

Upon his request, Mr. Janku made the motion that Mr. Coffman be allowed to abstain from voting on R183-99. The motion was seconded by Mr. Campbell and approved unanimously by voice vote.

The agenda, as amended, including the Consent Agenda, was approved unanimously by voice vote on a motion made by Mr. John and a second by Mrs. Crockett.

SPECIAL ITEMS
1. Government Finance Officers Association Distinguished Budget Preparation Award presented to the City of Columbia.
    Mayor Hindman announced that the City had recently been awarded the Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for its current annual budget. He pointed out this is the third year this award has been received by the City and it is the highest form of recognition in governmental budgeting.
    Mr. Beck accepted the award and acknowledged the work of the City staff and, in particular, Lori Fleming, the Finance Director, and her staff. He said the award is the result of proper planning by management.

SCHEDULED PUBLIC COMMENTS
None.

PUBLIC HEARINGS
B327-99 Establishing Parks and Recreation Department fees.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted the next several ordinances relate to the implementation of next year's budget. The proposed changes to the Parks and Recreation fees pertain to the noon basketball/volleyball program, the aquatic exercise program, and the Oakland facility. Staff projects that the fee increases will generate an additional $51,197 which will be appropriated to the recreation fee account.
    Ms. Crayton asked about fee increases for Douglass Pool. Mr. Hood explained that the proposed pool increase was only for the Oakland Family Aquatics Center. He explained the fee structure for the traditional swimming pools at Lake of the Woods and Douglass Park. He noted those fees will not be changing. Mr. Hood reported that scholarship programs are available for all of the swimming facilities.
    Mr. John asked if the projected figure assumes there will be no decrease in users. Mr. Hood replied that was correct.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mr. Coffman felt the need to make sure that a substantial amount of the operating cost is covered from fees. As the costs go up, he has concern for those families of limited means. He asked that those families be made aware of the scholarship activities.
    B327-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B328-99 Amending Chapter 27 relating to electric rates.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck said this amendment would reduce the amount paid by consumers by $2.1 million. He said the average homeowner would see a savings of approximately $1.12 per month.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comments, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B328-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B329-99 Amending Chapter 27 relating to water rates.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that this is the third of four proposed two percent increases approved by the voters. He reported next year staff will evaluate whether the final increase will be necessary. For the average homeowner, Mr. Beck said the increase would amount to approximately 28 cents per month and will begin with the October billing cycle. He noted that this would also increase the one time cost of a connection fee for new homes and businesses by five percent, and new developments after October 1 would be paying for fire hydrants. Mr. Beck pointed out this would shift some additional cost of providing those types of services to the developer.
    Mrs. Crockett asked if the developers have been advised of the proposed changes . Mr. Malon replied that staff has been in contact with those folks and have alerted them as to the changes and what will be expected of them and when.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mr. John asked if there is a projected amount that would be increased revenue, or lack of expense, for having the fire hydrants provided in the connect fees. Mr. Malon indicated there was money in the CIP to pay for the installation of new fire hydrants, and when the Council adopted this plan and approved the ballot issue that was sent to the voters, this amount had been limited to an approximate 2½ -3 year period. He explained that funding runs out at the end of this fiscal year. Mr. Malon noted there will be a minor amount in the CIP for replacement hydrants. Mr. John asked about the annual cost to the City on average. Mr. Malon said he did not have those figures with him, but it was probably in the range of $70,000 to $100,000. He commented the connect fee is only intended to recover the cost of the City doing the work.
    B329-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B330-99 Establishing new group insurance premiums for the employee health care plan.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained the employee health care plan will increase by five percent. He noted there was no health premium increase last year. Mr. Beck reported the intent of the increase is to cover both the medical costs to the City's self-insurance program and the administrative cost of operating that program by a third party.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B330-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B331-99 Amending the City of Columbia Money Purchase Plan.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this is a technical change in the ordinance relating to the Chief of Police position.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B331-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B332-99 Adopting the FY 2000 Pay Plan and Classification Plan.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that this bill would provide for a 2½% cost of living increase and a 3%, or forty cents per hour (whichever is higher), merit increase. He noted that money had been budgeted for a classification plan study this fiscal year in an attempt to address the various requests he received for changes in grades.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B332-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B333-99 Amending the City Employee Health Care Plan document.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would introduce a third level co-pay structure for the prescription drug program. By implementing this plan, the projected savings is estimated at $35,000 per year.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B333-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B334-99 Amending Chapter 19 of the City Code re: personnel policies, rules and regulations.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this amendment relates to personnel policies, the pay plan, and various benefit changes such as shift differential, safety glasses, contribution to the employee benefit fund, self-insurance, sick leave buy back, etc. He noted that all of the proposed changes to the personnel ordinances fall within the guidelines discussed during the budget work sessions.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B334-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

PR176-99 Establishing City Travel Policy.
    The policy resolution was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck commented he was hopeful this measure would save a lot of time and paper work. He noted that he has been signing a tremendous amount of small travel requests amounting to less than $50. As a result, Mr. Beck asked staff to streamline the process while at the same time remaining accountable to the City's travel policies. He reported all travel will still be accountable.
    Mr. Campbell made the motion that PR176-99 be amended per the amendment sheet. The motion was seconded by Mrs. Crockett and approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    The vote on PR176-99, as amended, was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Policy Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:

B285-99 Adopting the FY 2000 budget.
    The bill was read by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted an amendment sheet that was displayed on the overhead. He reported that some of the items on the amendment sheet he initiated because new information had come to light and he felt it best to address these issues now rather than amend the budget later. Mr. Beck pointed out that this would be the last public hearing related to the budget before its adoption.
    Mr. Janku made the motion that the Capital Improvement Plan (Item #34) be amended to increase that amount by $15,000 to enable the hiring of a consultant to begin the process of the irrigation of the fairways at both golf courses. The motion was seconded by Mr. Campbell and approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mr. Campbell noted that $8,750 had been proposed for the unfunded Cultural Arts programs, which amounted to 25% of the original request. He reported that figure should be actually be $8,228.
    Mr. Campbell made the motion that the amendment sheet be amended to reflect the correct amount of $8,228. The motion was seconded by Mayor Hindman.
    Mr. John made the motion that the amendment sheet be amended to delete the line item ($8,228) for the Cultural Arts programs.
    It was decided this motion would be discussed further after the public hearing.
    The motion made by Mr. Campbell to amend the amendment sheet, seconded by Mayor Hindman, was approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mayor Hindman reopened the public hearing.
    Norman Lenhardt, 1118 St. Christopher, asked how much it cost homeowners to connect to a water meter. Mr. John said for a 5/8" line the charge is $78 and a 1" line is $83. Mr. Lenhardt noted the City is charging just for the meter and the labor with no consideration given to the cost of the line being run from the well to the home. He believed all previous homeowners are also forced to pay those costs, and he resents that. Mr. Lenhardt stated he is frugal with his water in the winter, yet when it comes to May 1, he gets no consideration that he uses half as much water as the average person and he gets charged a 20% surcharge. In regards to the proposal to spend $15,000 for irrigation of the golf courses, Mr. Lenhardt suggested staff should calculate what it will cost on a yearly basis to run the system and pay for the water usage. He asked if the City would charge the golf courses 20% for their surcharge, or if it would be put back on the sales tax.
    Mr. Janku noted that the golf courses pay for themselves. In addition, the courses would be served by wells. Instead of putting so much effort into watering, Mr. Lenhardt suggested looking into buffalo grass which would not have to be watered so much.
    Reverend William Young, 3901 St.. Charles Road, passed out some letters of support for the Enterlight Ministries and their CDBG funding proposal. He noted that it had been stated that this program would be duplicating the services of the Homeowner Assistance Program, which he said would not occur.
    Mr. Janku asked if Enterlight Ministries will work with Enterprise Development, the group that processes the loans through the City's Home Ownership Program. Reverend Young replied that was correct. He pointed out Enterlight Ministries is currently in the process of assisting Enterprise Development with the purchase of some property.
    Mr. Campbell asked how many clients they expect to work with during the year. Reverend Young said he is working with 15 clients presently. Of the 15, Mr. Campbell asked how many clients would have the opportunity to buy a house within the next year. Reverend Young thought most all of them, working in some type of program, could be in a home. He said there are some cases that would take a little longer than 12 months because of credit problems, which Enterlight Ministries will help them with.
    Reverend Young reported his program will provide foreclosure counseling and debt credit counseling. In addition, they will teach clients to work within their budgets so they are able to pay off the debts that keep them from becoming a homeowner.
    Mr. Campbell asked if the CDBG budget would be final on October 18th. Mr. Hancock explained that on the 18th there will be a hearing on two documents; the Five Year Housing Plan and the Annual Action Plan. He said it will include whatever CDBG budget the Council adopts for FY2000. Mr. Hancock noted it is certainly the Council's prerogative to amend that budget.
    Jerry Blaise, 1702 Parker, spoke in support of Enterlight Ministries and Reverend Young's program. Mr. Blaise explained that he is a realtor with ReMax Boone Realty and that he helps Reverend Young with the home counseling sessions. He also represents Columbia Enterlight Ministries in some of their transactions with potential home buyers. He explained the main differences between Enterlight Ministries and the Home Ownership Program. Mr. Blaise stated if one does not qualify for the Home Ownership program, that would be the end of it. However, the Enterlight program empowers potential home buyers by giving them information about the process. He said it is also a program that will provide information on how to maintain a home and budget for home repairs. Mr. Blaise reported the entire process is supported from beginning to end.
    Philip Douse, 5917 O'Neal Road, reiterated the need for a van for the children at Rainbow House. He explained that they want to purchase a WindStar Van, which has one of the highest safety ratings for minivans.
    Mrs. Crockett asked if Rainbow House had received funding for a new van last year. Mr. Douse acknowledged that they purchased a 15 passenger van. However, he noted the need for a smaller vehicle when transporting only a few children.
    Bill Lloyd, 504 Rothwell, spoke in favor of the Enterlight Ministries Program and their funding request. Mr. Lloyd explained that he is employed by Boone National Savings who, earlier this year, launched a program of a similar nature in terms of community education, which particularly targets low to moderate income households. He said there is a great need amongst that group of people relating to the process of how to become homeowners. Mr. Lloyd felt that Enterlight's approach would be seen as less intimidating.
    Major Max Grindle, of the Salvation Army, 1108 W. Ash, reiterated their request for CDBG funds to enable them to build a new shelter. He said they have found strong support in the community for the Harbor House, and he hoped the City Council will recognize that now is the time for the City to make a significant contribution to the project. Major Grindle explained if the City could commit $100,000 to the Harbor House, they could begin construction next spring and begin serving more families by the fall of next year.
    Ray Warren, 208 E. Sexton, Acting President of the Douglass Neighborhood Association, asked the Council to reconsider the J.W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation's request for Cultural Affairs funding. He asked those present in support of their request to stand. Approximately 18 people stood.
    Alma Tapp, 410 Duncan, President of the Frederick Douglass Coalition, spoke in support of the J.W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation's request for funds to sponsor their annual festival.
    Wynna Faye Elbert, Vice President of the J. W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation, urged the Council's support of their request. Ms. Elbert also spoke in favor of the Enterlight Ministries request for CDBG funding. She said the Coalition has been working with Reverend Young for quite some time in developing this program.
    Arvarh Strickland, 4100 DeFoe, spoke as a board member of the J. W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation. He commended the Council, the City Manager, and the staff for the progress that has been made in giving the appropriate recognition to this individual. He urged the Council to not penalize this group for such a worthy project.
    Bill Thompson, 206 N. Garth, a member of the J. W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation board, as well as a member of the Missouri Arts Council's Festival Grant Selection Committee, understood that each agency has to have certain guidelines. He felt there sometimes needs to be a sensitivity to the need of a project. When a project has a large impact on a community, Mr. Thompson believed sometimes the need may arise beyond the normal guidelines in order for the project to continue. He noted the first festival had been a success and he was hopeful the funds would allow them to bring the community a new festival.
    Mrs. Crockett asked where the group had obtained funds for their first festival. Mr. Thompson said they received funding from the Cultural Affairs Office.
    Bill Lowery, explained that his father was the second black doctor in Columbia, and he knew Blind Boone as he had stayed at their house when he and his family lived in Columbia. Mr. Lowery said that he returned to Columbia with a room full of memorabilia that he would like to contribute to the Blind Boone Museum.
    Darrell Foster, 1305 White Oak, spoke in support of the J. W. Blind Boone Heritage Foundation's request. He asked the Council to do something constructive and positive for the African American community.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mr. Campbell found the discussion about the housing program by the Columbia Enterlight Ministries to be very thoughtful and important. He suggested that the City should attempt to fund it if possible.
    Mr. John indicated the Council had discussed the idea of directing the staff to look at existing CDBG funds to see what might be earmarked for the Salvation Army or for Enterlight Ministries. He noted this would be existing funding that has not been spent down. Mr. Janku pointed out that any adjustments could be made at the October 18th meeting.
    Mr. Campbell stated the amendment is take $20,000 from the street funds and replace the $20,000 from the existing street and sidewalk fund so as not to further tap the proposed CDBG funding. Mrs. Crockett wondered if they had it to spare in the street funds. Mr. Campbell proposed to take it out of the $235,000 that had been budgeted for existing streets and sidewalks. Mr. Janku said he would personally rather do this at the meeting on the 18th. He noted the CDBG fund is set up so that benefits accrue to low income home owners in that these individuals are allowed some reduction in tax bill costs. If the Council starts taking funds away from the CDBG program, Mr. Janku asked how those projects would be funded. Mr. Campbell replied it would be paid out of the street and sidewalk funds. Mr. Janku commented the City does not improve residential streets without tax billing. In the case of low income neighborhoods, the tax bills are paid out of CDBG funds. He wondered if the Council really should reduce that fund. Mr. Campbell said if the staff feels they could go the other way, he would be supportive of that. He just wants to see the projects funded and if it can be done from existing funds, so be it.
    Mr. Janku stated he would prefer to delay this decision until the 18th. He suggested that the Salvation Army request be addressed at the same time.
    Mr. Campbell asked if there were sufficient funds to meet the $70,000 and $20,000 out of existing funds. Regarding the $20,000 amount, Mr. Hancock thought the difference could be made up in the Third Avenue project from the CDBG Annual Streets and Sidewalks account. Mr. Hancock reported he would have to meet with the City Manager to look for opportunities to fund the $70,000 amount. He indicated there may be better options.
    Mr. Campbell made the motion that the staff be directed to examine existing sources of funding for the Salvation Army's $70,000 request, and for Enterlight Ministries' $20,000 proposal. The motion was seconded by Mrs. Crockett.
    Mr. Janku noted Mr. Hancock sent the Council a report detailing targeted improvement programs, primarily for the First Ward, which he did not think was technically in the budget. He commented if staff was going to be looking into existing sources of funding, he would like to see what could be done with this project at the same time. Mr. Hancock responded this particular program would not necessarily have to be subject to the hearing on the 18th. He explained the memo described there are some limited funds available from an old rehabilitation program. Mr. Hancock stated it is not a lot of money, but the Council and Manager need to made decisions on guidelines and what exactly should be done with it.
    The motion made by Mr. Campbell, seconded by Mrs. Crockett, was approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mr. John made the motion that B285-99 be amended by removing the $8,228 from the Cultural Affairs budget that was added for the four groups turning in late applications. The motion was seconded by Mrs. Crockett.
    Mr. Janku asked Mr. Campbell to explain his guidelines for how the $8,228 was to be used before voting on Mr. John's motion to delete it.
    Mr. Campbell said his proposal was that the money be returned to the Cultural Affairs Commission for their recommendation on the four programs. He said it did not mean that the Commission would have to give a certain amount to any one program, but rather they would base their decision on the merits of each proposal. Mr. Campbell stated the funding for each of the four proposals would be no more than 25% of the initial request. He added that this would be a one time, one year only request.
    Mrs. Crockett asked how Mr. Campbell could say this funding was being returned when it would actually be adding to the Cultural Affair's budget. Mr. Campbell said it would be an addition. Mr. Coffman said in a sense they would not be overturning the Cultural Affairs Commission in any way, they would merely be bumping up their budget for certain specifications. Mayor Hindman said it was not exactly an increase because funding would be restricted to the four programs that were rejected for lateness.
    Mrs. Crockett observed that in essence, the Cultural Affairs budget would be increased by 13%. She asked if the Council would be willing to increase every budget in the City by 13%. She thought not. Mrs. Crockett said the money should not be added because there was a deadline and all four groups knew when that deadline was. She noted the City does not accept late bids for any reason and the Commission should not accept late applications. She stated the Commission went through a lengthy review process before making their recommendations. Mrs. Crockett reported that she wholeheartedly supports all of these groups and wished they could all be funded, but the fact still remains that they did not turn their applications in on time. She believed to give funding to these programs would be opening a can of worms for next year.
    Mr. Campbell said the Cultural Affairs Commission had done an excellent job and exactly what they should have done based on their guidelines. He said it is the Council's responsibility to look at the total community, not at any one nitpicking rule or what it may or may not be. He noted that these are proposals from voluntary agencies, not bids from commercial agencies -- and there is a difference between the two. Mr. Campbell stated he is not recommending funding at the same rate the other agencies were recommended. Mr. Campbell believed it is important to look at what these organizations have contributed to the community. He believed they are unique programs and if the City does not fund them, the community is going to lose. Mr. Campbell did not think that was a risk the Council should take.
    Mr. John did not agree that it was a "nitpicking" rule to have an established deadline. He stated if they throw out the rule on what is a deadline, then there is no deadline and there are no rules. Mr. John explained the Council exists to establish and guide the City through laws and rules, and when the Council starts setting aside the rules for special pet programs or projects, then we are no longer a city that is fair to all. Just because people have been around and are known to have good projects, Mr. John said is no reason to bend the rules for these organizations. Mr. John noted that the City earmarked one-quarter of a million dollars for the Blind Boone Home. His point being that the city has a lot of money invested in that particular project because it will benefit the community. Mr. John commented that no one has said that any of the four projects in question were not good or beneficial to the community, nor did anyone tell any of these groups they could not turn in their applications early. Mr. John stated that to add specifically to a budget item for a group who missed a deadline just because the Council is afraid to say "no" is wrong. He said there is no doubt that each of the projects is worthy, but to do it this way is absolutely wrong.
    Mr. Coffman addressed the concept of fairness. He said fairness should include some sort of consistent application of rules and principles, but should also include the idea of equity in making exceptions when the circumstances warrant them in unique situations. Mr. Coffman felt that was what the Council is faced with at this point, and the Council has a discretionary budget which can be used for unforseen things such as this. He did not believe that granting the additional funding would be overturning what the Commission did. Mr. Coffman acknowledged that the City has invested a lot of money in the Blind Boone Home, and it is at a critical stage now. He believed if the Council did not consider the request of the Blind Boone Foundation, the City could lose its investment and a project that is very worthwhile.
    Ms. Crayton said that sometimes rules are made to be broken to benefit all of the community. She stated bringing the Rag Time Festival to Columbia would benefit the community by the tourists it will attract.
    Mr. Janku felt the logic would be to not approve the increase in funding to the Cultural Affairs budget. However, it is the Council's responsibility to pass the budget, and as part of that process, they need to determine what will benefit the community. He noted some Commission members voiced concern about the Boone Home project being a fund raising project, and he would be interested in their thoughts on that since the intent of the festival is directed to help restore a public building. Mr. Janku felt because the resources are available to be spent on programs that will benefit the community, he can support the increase in funding.
    Mayor Hindman reported the Commission's responsibility in this regard was to advise the Council on how the Arts money should be spent. He noted the Commission has a set of rules with respect to any application they are going to recommend to the Council. He explained that meant if one misses the deadline, that particular proposal simply would not get a recommendation from the Commission. Mayor Hindman commented the Commission deserves much credit for establishing a set of rules, using them, and making a recommendation based on them. He reported the Council is bound to try to make a determination among the Arts agencies themselves. And while the Council pays great attention to the Commission's recommendations, they have the right and duty to consider such situations as this one. Mayor Hindman did not see a logical reason for the Council not to increase the Cultural Affair's budget.
    The vote on the motion to amend, made by Mr. John, seconded by Mrs. Crockett, failed by voice vote.
    Mr. Campbell made the motion to amend B285-99 per the amended amendment sheet. The motion was seconded by Coffman and approved by voice vote.
    Mr. Janku noted that the City's budget is balanced in terms of revenues and expenditures, while also considering the needs of the community.
    B285-99, as amended, was read with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B301-99 Amending Chapter 23 of the Code to establish sign regulations for automatic teller machines.
    The bill was read by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would allow for a 75 square foot wall or canopy sign surface area for stand alone ATM's. He said it also addresses sign standards for an ATM located in an occupied building. Mr. Beck said the Planning and Zoning Commission reviewed this amendment and recommended approval.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comments, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B301-99 was read with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B306-99 Calling for bids for water main project on Clark Lane.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Malon explained that this is a water main extension along Clark Lane from Ballenger Place to St. Charles Road. He noted the water main extension on either side of this project has been completed, and this line will complete a gap and provide a large 12 inch feed all the way across Clark Lane. Mr. Malon noted the new main will also provide water pressures out to the far east end of the system and up north into the former Water District No. 2 system. He reported this project was included in the bond issue in CIP No. 73, and its estimated cost is $230,000.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    James German, 4217 Stevendave, asked if this project would help his neighborhood in Alumni Heights. Mr. Malon said the project would not include placing fire hydrants into that particular subdivision, but it would certainly improve the water flows in the area. He stated that Alumni Heights would receive hydrants within the next three years, and residents should already see a significant increase in water pressure already.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B306-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B316-99 Approving a revision to the Planned Unit Development Site Plan for Woodrail on the Green.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck said this would simply allow decks to encroach into the 25 foot setback line. He noted the Planning and Zoning Commission unanimously recommended approval for the plan.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Larry Niedergerke, 3713 Woodrail on the Green, explained that all of the buildings on this short cul-de-sac were constructed 18 to 20 years ago. At that time, the 25 foot setback requirement for PUD's was not in effect. Mr. Niedergerke thought the setback prior to that had been 7½ feet. He noted some of the decks already extend into the 25 foot setback. Mr. Niedergerke was not aware of any problems occurring with those decks. He reported the enforcement of the 25 foot rule is causing problems and will continue to create hardship if owners are not permitted to rebuild or replace decks and porches. Mr. Niedergerke related that people currently have projects on hold because of the setback requirement.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B316-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B317-99 Approving the "Providence Hill" C-P Development Plan; granting a variance to the subdivision regulations.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Hancock explained that the proposal is to build townhouses and apartments off the South Providence outer roadway. He said the Commission recommended approval on a 6-2 vote. He noted the one area of concern related to the request for a sidewalk variance. Mr. Hancock explained that the outer roadway is an unimproved road, and for years there has been a policy of not requiring the installation of sidewalks on unimproved roads, but that has changed over the past year or so. He said the developer has offered, and will dedicate to the City by way of plat, a 10 foot green space trail easement. It was felt it could be looked at as an alternative walkway to serve the pedestrian needs in the vicinity until (and if) the road is improved and sidewalks can be put in place. Mr. Hancock noted the severity of the terrain and it was the developer's opinion that it would be very difficult to build a sidewalk.
    Mr. Janku asked if the staff had evaluated the easement in terms of how practical it is for use by pedestrians. Mr. Hancock felt it would work fine and said everyone who reviewed the plans looked at that particular aspect and had no problems with it.
    Mayor Hindman understood the easement would extend to Epple Field. Mr. Hancock said the developers indicated that was the long term plan. Mayor Hindman expressed concern about the pedestrian situation in that area because of the increase in population. He said it appeared to be about 1½ miles to Rock Bridge High School, and assumed there would be kids going to school there as well as to Rock Bridge Elementary. Mayor Hindman pointed out there is almost no sidewalk network in place for these kids. Mr. John noted that the elementary school children would go to Grant Elementary School and they would be bused.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Bruce Beckett, an attorney with offices located at 901 E. Broadway, spoke on behalf of the applicants. He noted that Chris Stormer, a principle in the applicant's business, and Dan Brush, the engineer that assisted the applicant in assembling the plan, were also present. Mr. Beckett pointed out that the applicant owns the four acre tract that lies to the north of the subject property. Their proposal was that the 10 foot trail easement would go not only along the front of the property covered by the C-P Plan, but would also extend to the four acre tract that lies to the north of this site as well. Mr. Beckett stated the four acre tract is also extremely steep from its frontage on Route K to the west end of it. He indicated it is not a developable piece of property from the south. Mr. Beckett said there is a possibility of some development on the northern side of the tract.
    Mr. Campbell asked if this would be the same type of development as has occurred on the property to the south. Mr. Beckett believed it to be about the same -- it would be metal roof with frame construction. He explained on this particular site there will be 72 units, the applicant's office, and a pool to serve the residents living in the complex. Mr. Beckett reported the units will be primarily targeted to young professionals and college students. Mr. Campbell noted the development to the south is primarily students, therefore, there would be fewer children involved. Mr. Beckett said he believed that to be accurate. He understood the Mayor's comments about pedestrian traffic, however, in this case residents would consist of young professionals and college students with vehicles.
    Mr. Campbell asked about the life expectancy of the buildings. Mr. Stormer said he guessed the life to be at least 20 years.
    Mayor Hindman stated the existing buildings remind him of military barracks and asked if the new development would look like that. Mr. Beckett assumed they would look about the same. He did not know that the design criteria had ever been addressed during discussions of the plan. Mayor Hindman noted this is a very conspicuous area. Mr. Beckett pointed out when driving down Providence Road, one can barely see what is there now. He said there is a heavy stand of trees on the property directly across the street from this property. In addition, he observed the structures to the south have rented out quickly so there must be a great demand for them. Mr. Beckett spoke about the need for affordable housing in Columbia. He also noted that 58% of the site is in green space, including over an acre of climax forest.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mr. Janku said apparently the easement will address the pedestrian access to the University. He thought the Mayor's comments about the need for pedestrian access along Providence Road were true, and said the City should look to address this issue in the future.
    Mayor Hindman said if this easement extends to Epple Fields, it will probably connect to the University Trail which will go up to Brewer Field House. He said if most of the residents in this development are University students, that pedestrian connection would be a plus, although he did not think this complex will be exclusively occupied by University students.
    Mr. John agreed there was not much room for a sidewalk, and he noted a large number of power lines in the area that may or may not have to be moved if ever the road is improved. He stated the City's plans for PUD's and C-P's and the protection of climax forests usually results in the protection of creek valleys, steep terrain, and those types of areas because that is where the trees are located. Although, Mr. John noted that is the purpose of bunching things together -- to allow for high density development on flat terrain so as to protect the rest of the areas. He believed if this property had not been protected with PUD/C-P plans and climax forests, it would be developed. Mr. John noted this tract of land has been on the market for a long time.
    Regarding the development to the south, Mr. Campbell commented while the City does not have the same landscaping requirements in residential areas as in commercial areas, he was struck by the sparsity of landscaping in the southern development. As this project moves forward, Mr. Campbell is hopeful more landscaping will be provided.
    Mayor Hindman noted that while he is not opposed to the density of the development, he is not very fond of the architecture.
    B317-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B318-99 Approving a revision to the "Boone County Fire Protection District Offices" C-P Development Plan.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would allow for a change in the free standing and wall signs. He said the property is located on the northwest corner of Stadium and I-70 Drive NW. The Commission recommended approval on an 8-0 vote.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Eric Miller, a project manager with Peckham and Wright Architects, spoke on behalf of the Boone County Fire Protection District. He explained the District is asking to modify the existing signage on the building. He explained the proposal.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B318-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

OLD BUSINESS
B307-99 Appropriating funds for the Columbia Terminal Railroad.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this will appropriate an additional $15,000 for rail cars because of an increased volume of steel coil used by customers in Columbia.
    Comments were called for with none received.
    B307-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B313-99 Authorizing the demolition of 9 Third Avenue and calling for bids.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained the procedure that had been followed with respect to a public hearing before the Public Works Director. The recommendation is that the Council authorize the removal of the structure and tax bill the cost to the property owner.
    Mayor Hindman asked what would happen after the structure is removed and a lien is placed on the property. He asked if the City would enforce the lien by selling the property. Mr. Boeckmann said sometimes there are outstanding deeds of trust and the City does not always recover the money.
    Mr. Janku said the issue of the vacant lot needed to be addressed. He commented it would be great if the property was productive once again with a new home being built on it, but he was not certain the mechanism is in place to do so.
    Mayor Hindman asked if the City could sell the property subject to the deed of trust. Mr. Boeckmann outlined the process of selling property on the Court House steps, and pointed out that sometimes back taxes and deeds of trust are so much that nobody will be interested in it.
    Mr. Campbell said if there is a deed of trust against it, he assumed the bank would act on such to get their money back as well.
    Norman Lenhardt, 1118 St. Christopher, asked if there would be a possibility of the City donating the property to Habitat for Humanity. Mayor Hindman replied the City does not currently own the tract, so we would not have that opportunity. Mr. Lenhardt asked if the City would have an opportunity to put a bid in on it. Mr. Janku explained that generally other organizations like Habitat and Enterprise Developments do that kind of thing. He said the problem is that these organizations do not have the condemnation authority the City has. In addition, Mr. Janku stated the City would not get involved in a situation where we would be bidding against groups such as those. Mr. Beck noted that the owner may not want to sell the property.
    Mr. John explained that if the owner pays the tax bill when it comes due, he would keep the property and the City would not have an option. If it is foreclosed on at the Court House steps, then the high bidder, whoever wants it more, can buy it. Since it would be a leveled off lot, Mr. John believed the bank would hope somebody buys it and they would probably forgive the rest of the note when it is sold because they would have to pay taxes on it if they keep it. He said banks usually call people who are interested in those types of properties so they can organize a deal before the sale.
    B313-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows; VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B314-99 Authorizing Change Order No. 2 to the contract with United HRB General Contractors, Inc. for the 8th and Cherry parking structure project; appropriating funds.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that several major change orders had been necessary. He said the renovated garage was about complete and they should be ready to dedicate it shortly. Mr. Montgomery added the garage reopened last Thursday and they are working on the punch list items right now. He explained that the contractor has 30 days from the 10th of September to complete those. Mr. Montgomery understood the artist would come in around the middle of October to work on the neon lighting and the stair tires. They anticipate a dedication sometime during the week of October 11.
    Mr. Janku noted that there are three parking structures on Cherry Street. He pointed out that there has been tremendous commercial revitalization on this street during the last few years. Mr. Janku felt that was a direct correlation and added that he sees businesses advertising their proximity to the City parking structures. He said there are additional needs for parking north of Broadway, which the City is currently working on, but they no longer hear about the need for parking downtown. He noted that the garages are paid for out of user fees.
    B314-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B315-99 Appropriating funds for the Cosmo Park hard surface trail and skateboard park.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would formally appropriate several items; a $41,000 donation from the Cosmo Luncheon Club, a $1,200 donation from the Cosmo Breakfast Club, and a $4,600 grant from the Department of Natural Resources.
    On behalf of the Council and staff, Mayor Hindman once again thanked the Cosmopolitan Club for their donations over the years.
    B315-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B319-99 Voluntary annexation of land located east of Sinclair Street and south of heritage Meadows Subdivision.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mayor Hindman noted this bill was to be held over to the next meeting. As no comments were made he announced that it would be held over to the October 4, 1999, meeting.

B325-99 Amending Chapter 16 of the Code as it relates to noise from radios, phonographs, etc.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would allow Police Officers to issue summons in cases of loud sounds coming from car sound systems at a distance of 50 feet any time of the night or day. The sounds from buildings would be enforced from 50 feet between 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m., and 100 feet from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
    Mayor Hindman asked about high school bands. Mr. Boeckmann noted a separate section in the ordinance which allows these groups to practice during certain times.
    B325-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows; VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B326-99 Authorizing an annexation agreement with Henry R. Miller and Frances S. Miller.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this approximate 10 acre tract of land is located in the southeast part of the City. Presently, only one structure would be affected by this agreement.
    B326-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B335-99 Amendment to Hangar Lease with Ozark Management, Inc. and Consent to Assignment of Lease.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck said this would simply change the agreement by reassigning the deed of trust to the lender, Union Planters Bank.
    B335-99 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

CONSENT AGENDA
The following bills were given second reading and the resolutions were read by the Clerk.
B304-99 Levying and assessing special tax to abate a weed nuisance at 804 Seventh Street.
B305-99 Accepting easements for utility purposes.
B308-99 Authorizing the acquisition of easements for the construction of the Fourth Avenue improvement project.
B309-99 Calling for bids for the reconstruction of Scott Boulevard from Bellview Drive northward to Brookview
               Terrace.
B310-99 Calling for bids for the Worley Street and Again Street West drainage improvement project.
B311-99 Calling for bids for the Alton Avenue Phase 3 storm drainage improvement project.
B312-99 Confirming the contract of Don Schnieders Excavating Co., Inc. for construction of Paris Road/Hinkson
               Avenue intersection improvements.
B320-99 Vacating a drainage easement located within Smithton Ridge, Plat 2, a proposed subdivision.
B321-99 Approving the final plat of Smithton Ridge, Plat 2; authorizing a performance contract.
B322-99 Approving the final plat of The Village of Cherry Hill, Plat 3; authorizing a performance contract.
B323-99 Approving the final plat of Littlebear Industrial Park; authorizing a performance contract.
B324-99 Making technical corrections to Ordinance No. 16126 which amended Chapter 29 of the City Code as it
               relates to the M-R District.
R177-99 Setting a public hearing: construction of an 8-inch water main near Lange Middle School and Arcadia
               Subdivision.
R178-99 Setting a public hearing: voluntary annexation located on the south side of Vawter School Road, between
               Scott Boulevard and Old Mill Creek Road.
R179-99 Setting a public hearing: voluntary annexation of property located on the west side of Bearfield Road,
               approximately 500 feet south of Nifong Boulevard.
R180-99 Setting a public hearing: construction of sanitary sewer improvements to the Cow Branch Pump Station
               and Force Main, Cow Branch Outfall Sewer, and CB-4 and CB-5 Trunk Sewers.
R181-99 Setting a public hearing: Special Business District FY 2000 budget.
R183-99 Authorizing an agreement with Ameren UE for the relocation of a gas line along Grant Lane.
R184-99 Authorizing an agreement with Black & Veatch Corporation to evaluate the biosolids disposal program
               and sludge fields at the wastewater treatment plant.
R185-99 Authorizing an agreement with U.S. Geological Survey for groundwater monitoring in the vicinity of the
               wetlands.
R186-99 Accepting a Law Enforcement Traffic Services Grant from the Missouri Division of Highway Safety.

    The bills were given third reading and the resolutions were read with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. (Mr. Coffman abstained from voting on R183-99.) Bills declared enacted and resolutions declared adopted, reading as follows:

NEW BUSINESS
R182-99 Authorizing a power sale agreement with CellNet Data Services, Inc.
R187-99 Authorizing an antenna license agreement with CellNet Data Services, Inc.
    Both resolutions were read by the Clerk.
    Mayor Hindman asked that the bills be read and discussed together. He noted the Council would vote on the issues separately.
    Mr. Malon explained that CellNet Services is an automated meter reading system that Ameren/Union Electric uses to read their electric and gas meters. He reported that CellNet has systems throughout the entire metropolitan St. Louis area and are now moving in the outlying areas. He understood that Boone Electric is also using this system. Mr. Malon explained the system uses cell phone technology and a request was submitted regarding the City providing CellNet with some small antenna sites around the community.
    Bill Weber, Project Engineering Manager for CellNet Data Services, explained they are requesting the use of pole space to mount their micro cell controllers, which are data collectors for automatic meter reading that provide daily delivery of reads to Ameren UE and Boone Electric Coop.
    Mayor Hindman noted that the fee is $500 and he wondered if that was for the whole system. Mr. Weber said that was in the agreement the city offered to CellNet. Mayor Hindman thought the amount was amazingly low. Mr. Malon explained the fee schedule associated with the pole attachment agreements the City has with the phone and cable TV companies runs somewhere in the neighborhood of $3.00 per attachment. He noted 150 attachments multiplied by $3.00 would amount to $500. Mr. Malon reported the City would not need to change out poles, CellNet is just asking to attach the readers onto existing poles. He pointed out the fee could be whatever amount the Council felt CellNet should pay, however, they should look to the future and the possibility that we might want to use the system at some point. He related that the City would just have to pay that fee back to ourselves anyway.
    Mayor Hindman asked if this agreement would effectively give CellNet a monopoly. Mr. Weber did not believe this would occur. He responded that CellNet is simply requesting the use of City poles for installation of their system for the purpose of providing meter reads to Ameren UE. Mr. Malon explained CellNet would have the infrastructure in place, but it would not give them a monopoly. He reported staff considered the option of going to automatic meter reading, and if this occurred, it would be to our advantage because the structure would already be in place. Mr. Malon commented it would be expensive to overlay one system over another, but that did not mean it could not be done. Mayor Hindman asked if the systems were overlaid, whether that meant a whole new set of antennas on each pole. Mr. Malon replied that these units would not be on each pole, he explained that they would be scattered at strategic places around the community. Mayor Hindman wondered about line of sight and additional tree trimming. Mr. Malon explained CellNet could trim around the pole where the antenna would be situated, but certainly not in the line of sight between the antenna locations. Mr. Weber confirmed that they do not have any active tree trimming practices.
    Mr. Campbell asked about the new decorative poles, and wondered if the City would be locked into having one particular type of antenna on the wooden poles. Mr. Weber stated the type of antenna is driven by the distance from the cell master. He said typically a 1½-2 mile radius from the cell master calls for the installation of an omni, rather than yagi, antenna. He explained that the yagi antenna has cross hatches on it, similar to a TV antenna. Mr. Campbell questioned whether the city would have any control over types of antenna. Mr. Weber indicated CellNet will submit a site plan subject to City approval before any construction can begin. Mr. Malon stated staff will not specify what kind of antenna must be installed at each particular site, but they would make sure all necessary safety codes are met. Mr. Campbell commented his neighborhood already has an array of wiring out in front of the homes and he did not think anything else would be well received. Mr. Weber displayed a sample of a unit which was about one cubic foot in size. He noted these systems are considerably smaller than transformers or capacitor banks.
    Mr. Coffman asked Mr. Malon if he thought the City should prepare for a contingency of competitors. He wondered if three or four more companies wanted to install the units, whether that would overburden the existing poles. Mr. Malon said it is very unlikely that more than one unit could be placed on a pole.
    Mr. Beck wondered if any complaints have been received in the areas where these systems have been installed. Mr. Weber responded CellNet has installed somewhere around 8,000 of the systems. He related that his company is very sensitive to the customers that have issues with the boxes, and he estimated out of the 8,000 units that have been installed, they may have received 15 complaints. Mr. Weber noted in those cases, the units were moved to alternative sites immediately.
    Mr. John asked what how the installation would occur on decorative light poles. Mr. Weber replied a flat panel is used that is less conspicuous than the yagi antenna. He said the repeater units do not have a top antenna, they have omni antennas that go out the bottom.
    Mr. Janku asked if most communities charge a flat fee or a per site fee. Mr. Weber said this is the first pole license he has had to obtain as Ameren UE have their own poles. Mr. Janku believed a per site fee would encourage minimal pole usage.
    Mr. John felt the installation costs and the cost of the antennas would have a lot more impact than the $3.00 charge. He was mostly concerned about whether the company would respond to neighborhood complaints, and because these units can be moved, he can support the agreement.
    Mr. Coffman said this would be somewhat precedent setting as the City is just now moving toward more wireless technology. He was certain it would increase and is concerned about how the tops of the poles would look in a few years. Mr. John said if two or three competing companies came in, they would still be on a small percentage of the thousands of poles located throughout the City. Mr. Coffman acknowledged that was true, and even if most of the lines are buried, there would still be street lights.
    Mr. Malon said it was difficult to say what was going to happen on automated metering systems. He noted there are currently two main companies that provide this service, and if Ameren and Boone Electric wire out now, the only two other meters left in town to read are the City of Columbia water and electric meters. He said whether or not a customer will be allowed to choose who reads their meters is undetermined. However, Mr. Malon reported there is legislation being considered that indicates that will not be the case. He added that currently the field is wide open and changing every day.
    The vote on R182-99 was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:
    The vote on R187-99 was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: COFFMAN, HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:

    The following bills were introduced by the Mayor, unless otherwise indicated, and all were given first reading:

B336-99 Authorizing construction of an 8-inch water main near Lange Middle School and Arcadia Subdivision.
B337-99 Accepting easements for utility purposes.
B338-99 Confirming the contract of C.L. Richardson Construction Co., Inc. for the construction of a water main
               from Route B to Roger Wilson Drive.
B339-99 Authorizing the acquisition of water line easements along the COLT Railroad on Route B.
B340-99 Approving the engineer's final report for the Sixth and Cherry parking structure.
B341-99 Authorizing the acquisition for trail easements necessary to construct the Bear Creek Trail Phase IV
               project.
B342-99 Calling for bids for the construction of sidewalks along the east side of Providence Road from Business
               Loop 70 to Texas Avenue.
B343-99 Vacating a utility easement located within Atkins Subdivision.
B344-99 Vacating a sanitary sewer easement located on Lot 5 of Chalet Subdivision.
B345-99 Approving the final plat of Quail Creek, Plat No. 1; authorizing a performance contract.
B346-99 Approving the final plat of Stoneridge Estates, Plat 3A; authorizing a performance contract.
B347-99 Approving a revision to Lot 9 of the Forum Chapel Plaza C-P Development Plan.
B348-99 Rezoning property located at 29 East Ash Street from R-3 to O-1.
B349-99 Rezoning property located on the south side of St. Charles Road, east of Hominy Branch, from A-1 to
               PUD-10.
B350-99 Approving the Special Business District FY 2000 budget.

REPORTS AND PETITIONS
A) Intra-Departmental Transfer of Funds.
    Report accepted.

B) Petition to Improve Heather Lane.
    Mr. Beck explained that the Broadway Christian Church requested the improvement. The estimated cost of the project is $175,000, with $54,320 being paid by tax bills and the remaining $120,000 being paid by the City.
    Because this is a paper street, Mr. Janku understood if the Church wants to put the street in, they could. Mr. Beck agreed a permit could be issued. He noted staff talked about opening it some years ago when development was occurring in the area, prior to the west portion of Ash Street being paved. Mr. Beck indicated there had been opposition to the proposal at that time, but did not know if that was still the case.
    Mr. Janku said recently the City has been careful about allowing access to major thoroughfares. He commented that Broadway is a fairly busy street. Since the plan was laid out in the early seventies, there have been many changes to this area with the addition of MBS and the Columbia Mall. He noted there is a lot of cut through traffic and stopping and turning on Broadway. In other developments, Mr. Janku stated the City has tried to avoid that sort of thing. He remarked there is an existing exit to Broadway that is over burdened, and this will add two entrances/exits in close proximity. For the Church to need access from Ash Street to its parking lot is one thing, but another access onto a four lane highway Mr. Janku questioned from a public safety standpoint.
    Mr. Beck said a right of use permit for a driveway approach might be the way to go. He said that would limit access to the Church's parking lot and not to other traffic from Ash Street.
    Mr. Campbell pointed out that anymore the City has a policy that most local residential streets are built by the developer for the area being served. In this case, the City is being asked to pick-up about two-thirds of the cost for the street improvement. Since it would basically serve private property, he wondered if the Church could pay for a substantial part, if not all, of the cost.
    Mr. Janku said he would like to see some analysis of what the traffic flow would be and how to deal with the issue of accessing Broadway.
    Mr. Montgomery said the report recommended proceeding toward a public hearing. He acknowledged that the design work was completed about 20 years ago and needs to be updated. Mr. Montgomery indicated it would not take a tremendous amount of time to design a road. However, a decision needs to be made as to where the road and sidewalks should be placed. He noted the right of way is in place.
    Mr. Beck commented that this might be a perfect location for a narrower street if it is built. He saw no reason for on-street parking.
    Mr. Janku made the motion that the staff be directed to come back with an additional report on the traffic safety issues raised.
    Mayor Hindman remarked the City is working on getting a grid system in place, so in effect, this would provide another access to alleviate the pressure on other streets.
    In addition, Mr. Campbell asked whether there would be a need for a left turn, and if so, would Broadway be wide enough to accommodate it. He questioned if that would be an additional cost and who would pay it.
    The motion made by Mr. Janku was seconded by Mr. Campbell and approved unanimously by voice vote.

C) Name Change for the East/West Portion of Brown Station Road.
    Mrs. Crockett made the motion that the name change process begin. The motion was seconded by Mr. Janku and approved unanimously by voice vote.

D) Southeast Fire Station Site.
    Mr. Beck explained this report dealt with looking into an alternative site in southeast Columbia for the Fire Station. He said the station would still be in the proximity of the overall plan, but not on the site originally discussed.
    Mr. Campbell made the motion that staff be directed to proceed with appraisals and negotiations. The motion was seconded by Mrs. Crockett and approved unanimously by voice vote.

E) Armory Report.
    Mr. Beck explained that when the renovation work was bid, the specification contained an upgrade of the air conditioning system and some other mechanical work. He said the alternative bids had been high and it was felt the City could not afford the mechanical work. Since then, staff reviewed the project with HUD representatives and discussed the eligibility of using additional HUD money in this case. Because of the need for the City to spend down some of the CDBG money on a timely basis, Mr. Beck said staff is recommending that the mechanical system be replaced along with the renovation work. He requested authorization to transfer $200,000 out of the public health facility account into the Armory account. Mr. Beck reported staff would look toward replenishing the health account as they start moving forward with a joint agreement with the County Commission.
    Mayor Hindman made the motion that the staff be authorized to proceed with the contract using the funding as described. The motion was seconded by Mr. Campbell and approved unanimously by voice vote.
 
BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
    Upon receiving the majority vote of the Council the following individuals were appointed to the following Boards and Commission:

BICYCLE/PEDESTRIAN COMMISSION
Barringhaus, Cory R.

CONVENTION & VISITORS ADVISORY BOARD
Otto, Fred H., 1600 Doris, Ward 2 - term to expire 9/30/01
Schultz, Thomas D., 1311 Troon, Ward 5 - term to expire 9/30/01
Shah, Arvind P., 601 Adens Woods, Ward 3 - term to expire 9/30/01

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD
Dunscombe, Vicki B., 3428 Woodrail Terrace, Ward 5 - term to expire 9/30/02
Jenks, Ronald R., 5501 Carrick Ct., Ward 5 - term to expire 9/30/02
Kamps, Thomas H., 1107 Club Meadows, Ward 5 - term to expire 9/30/02
 

COMMENTS OF THE COUNCIL, STAFF, AND PUBLIC
    Mrs. Crockett announced that this was the last council meeting for Chief Botsford. She said he has done many positive things for Columbia and a lot of people hate to see him leave. Mayor Hindman confirmed everyone feels the same.
    Mr. John received a letter from a constituent expressing their support for the Community Policing Program and the courage of the City Council to continue to make it a high priority. He reported this individual found that the regular officer in the neighborhood made residents more aware of aesthetic problems. Mr. John noted that previous comments have been made about these types of problems being confined to one basic area in the City. He pointed out there are problem areas throughout the community and everyone is concerned about them. The letter also communicated that because residents now know the police officers on a personal basis, they felt more comfortable with them. Mr. John expressed his thanks to the Police Department and the Police Chief.
    Mr. Coffman announced that a series of burglaries have taken place in his neighborhood and the Police Department have been able to put out automatic messages which work really well. He indicated his neighborhood is very supportive of the Community Policing Program.
    Ms. Crayton thanked Chief Botsford for all that he has done for this community. She was sure the good attitude of the department would continue.
    Mr. Janku said Chief Botsford has been able to implement change in a very successful and almost non-controversial manner. He thanked him for the improvements and contributions he has made to this community.
    Mr. Janku noted the decline in the City's sales tax growth, and he wondered if it was possible to collect revenues from other utilities that provide service to the community. These monies would be placed in the general fund to help provide a more balanced source of revenue for the community in the future.
    Mr. Janku made the motion that the staff be directed to report back on their thoughts as to whether or not it would be appropriate for other utilities to contribute to the general fund. The motion was seconded by Mayor Hindman and approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mr. Janku indicated there has been some discussion regarding the dedication of the Bear Creek Trail parking lot. He asked if more rock could be spread along portions of the trail. Mr. Janku noted a lot of work has been done to shore up the creek and stabilize the bank, and he thought the rock could be put in on top of that.
    Mrs. Crockett commented on the number of people standing on street corners asking for money. She has received many complaints about the situation and noted the City cannot do anything about it because of the freedom of speech issue. Mrs. Crockett explained that recently she was in the Clark Lane/U.S. 63/Conley area, and noticed there were people in orange vests with white buckets collecting money for homeless children. She stated these individuals were running between vehicles to collect money. Mrs. Crockett indicated she reported this to the Police Department and the situation was taken care of. She encouraged anyone seeing this type of activity to report it to the Police.
    Mr. Janku agreed that these folks are a distraction to motorists. He thought there must be a way to deal with the situation.
    Mr. Campbell reported other cities must do something because they do not have the same density of people performing this activity as Columbia has. He asked Mr. Boeckmann to find out what other cities do about the problem.
    Mayor Hindman asked if people seeking charitable contributions have to obtain a permit. Mr. Boeckmann said there are restrictions that apply and he would check into it.
    Mayor Hindman asked that the pedestrian situation be looked into by Rock Bridge High School. He commented there is a lot of traffic on the outer roadway with no sidewalk network in place. Mayor Hindman felt there was potential for using the landscaped area. Mr. Janku believed that to be correct, but the challenge would be the cross streets.
    Mayor Hindman made a motion that the staff report back on the situation. The motion was seconded by Mr. Janku and approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mr. Beck thanked the Council for all of the time they spent working on the budget.
    Mr. Beck noted that Chief Botsford's resignation date had been set for October 4th. He related that he would be appointing an Acting Chief some time this week. Mr. Beck thanked Chief Botsford and noted he had done a great job in implementing the Community Policing Program. He said the community has been very complimentary of the Chief and the programs that have been carried out. Mr. Beck was hopeful of finding someone capable of continuing the same type program.
    Norman Lenhardt, 1118 St. Christopher, pointed out items dealing with water mains in areas of the City that were unpopulated 25 years ago. He said none of the people living in those areas have ever contributed a nickel to the water main in his subdivision, or to any of the streets in his area. He believed the fees for the current projects would be shared by everyone. Mr. Lenhardt suggested that the costs involved should be identified and charged on a pro-rated basis, including the line itself, to those people who are receiving the benefit from that particular service.
    Mr. Janku said the entire community is paying to rebuild some of the infrastructure in the older parts of town Mr. Lenhardt is referring to. Mr. Campbell said it is true the City is only charging a very small portion of the costs associated with new development. Mr. John observed that none of those people have paid an extra connect, and they have been living off the people who built the first system. He noted they have been paying into the entire system their whole lives. Mr. John reported if the City started charging an impact fee, they would have to set a two tier rate. Mr. Beck noted that the community as a whole pays for treatment, the large conveyance lines, and so forth. He stated the neighborhoods pay for the eight inch lines in the subdivisions and in areas where there are septic tanks. Individual property owners pay for the building connection. Mr. Beck stated that establishes three levels of payment and it is rigidly followed.
    Henry Lane, 1816 E. Broadway, spoke about increasing ridership on the City buses. He suggested marketing the system to school children.
    The meeting adjourned at 10:55 p.m.

                                                                                            Respectfully submitted,

                                                                                            Penny St. Romaine
                                                                                            City Clerk