M I N U T E S
CITY COUNCIL MEETING - COLUMBIA, MISSOURI
AUGUST 21, 2000
 

INTRODUCTORY
    The City Council of the City of Columbia, Missouri met for a regular meeting at 7:00 p.m., on Monday, August 21, 2000, in the Council Chamber of the City of Columbia, Missouri. The roll was taken with the following results: Council Members HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN and COFFMAN were present. Members CAMPBELL and JOHN left the meeting at 10:30. The City Manager, City Counselor, City Clerk, and various Department Heads were also present.
 

APPROVAL OF MINUTES
    The minutes of the regular meeting of August 7, 2000, were approved unanimously by voice vote on a motion made by Mr. Campbell and a second by Ms. Crayton.
 

APPROVAL AND ADJUSTMENT OF AGENDA INCLUDING CONSENT AGENDA
    The agenda, including the Consent Agenda, was approved unanimously by voice vote on a motion made by Mrs. Crockett and a second by Mr. Campbell.
 

SPECIAL ITEMS
    None.
 

SCHEDULED PUBLIC COMMENTS
    None.
 

PUBLIC HEARINGS
B225-00     Setting property tax rates for 2000.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that the budget he presented in August included a property tax rate of $0.41, the same as it has been for several years. He further explained that $0.31 of the total would go to the General Fund which is used for the general operations of the city. The remaining ten cents will be used for debt service. Mr. Beck noted that the City's property tax rate is only $0.01 higher than what it was in 1985.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comments, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B225-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B226-00     Adopting the FY 2001 Budget.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that the budget document is available on the Internet as well as the Public Library. He explained that the City's budget is made up of several funds. Mr. Beck reported that basic operations of the City are paid for out of the General Fund, which includes funding for police, fire, as well as a portion of both the Public Works and Parks and Recreation operations.
    Dave Griggs, Chair of the Cultural Affairs Commission, explained the Commission's recommendations for FY 2001 funding of Cultural Arts contracts with local arts organizations. He noted that the contracts are being recommended in two categories: presentation and education projects. Mr. Griggs explained the procedures the Commission followed in soliciting and reviewing applications. Of the 21 requests submitted from 19 organizations, the Commissioners were able to allocate $68,598.
    Kevin Kovall, Chair of the Convention and Visitors Advisory Board, explained the Board's recommendations for allocations from the Tourism Development fund. He indicated half of the revenues generated from the hotel tax will go towards marketing and the other half towards increased promotion of Columbia through cultural and tourism heritage events for new functions.
    Suzanne Hughes, 457 N. Sequoia, spoke on behalf of First Night Columbia and summarized their two requests for funding found in the budget. She indicated one funding request was submitted through the Parks and Recreation Department budget and the other through the Convention and Visitors Bureau. Ms. Hughes reported the request through the Bureau is designed to enhance the current event through targeted advertising to pull people in from over a two hour radius.
    Kay Challen, Executive Director of the Columbia Art League, explained that the League also has submitted two separate requests; one to the Office of Cultural Affairs and one to the Convention and Visitors Bureau. The first submittal involves bringing in a mobile glass studio for the Art in the Park event. The second request she described as a collaborative effort with the University Concert Series where they will be bringing in the Preservation Hall Jazz Band for a concert Saturday night, the weekend of Art in the Park, in the belief that some of those people who come to Art in the Park will stay overnight for the concert. Ms. Challen reported the Jazz Band will also be performing at Art in the Park to give people a taste of what the concert will be like.
    Lucille Salerno, President of the John William Boone Heritage Foundation, spoke in favor of the endorsement of the recommendations made by the Convention and Visitors Advisory Board relating to the new tourism funding allocations. She explained that her group applied for funding for a Rag Time Festival to occur immediately following the Scott Joplin Festival in Sedalia. Ms. Salerno reported that 42% of their requested allocation would go toward advertising promotion outside of Columbia.
    Carrie Gartner, Executive Director of the Central Columbia Association, reported the festival people are very zealous and excited about what they do and did not feel that one festival a year is enough. She said they have learned to spread their money pretty thin over the eight or nine weeks they have to put on the Twilight Festival. Ms. Gartner noted that the Twilight Festival is a great opportunity to extend a weekend for vacationers from out of town as they could attend the Jazz Festival, Art in the Park, etc. She explained their three plans for the grant.
    Cookie Hagan, Columbia Parks and Recreation Department, explained the request for additional funding for the Boone County Heritage Festival through the Convention and Visitors Advisory Board Tourism and Development allocations. The Heritage Festival would begin on Friday evening rather than Saturday morning. She explained the additional advertising and extended hours will hopefully encourage tourists to arrive earlier and stay for a longer period of time. Ms. Hagan noted that the additional funding would also allow for an increase in the number of traditional artisans who participate in the Heritage Festival. The funding will also be used for added music venues utilizing the Maplewood Barn Theater stage. Ms. Hagan said the prize incentives awarded to visitors at the Festival are intended to encourage future participation in upcoming special events such as the Missouri Fall Festival of the Arts and The First Night Celebration.
    Sally Comprado, University Concert Series, explained that this year they would be hosting the 2000 Columbia Holiday Festival -- a five night event. She reported it had been put together with the intention of trying to get people to spend more than one night in Columbia. Ms. Comprado noted they have a very aggressive advertising campaign planned.
    Mayor Hindman continued the public hearing to the next meeting.
 

B227-00     Calling for bids for the rehabilitation of the airfield lighting control cables at Columbia Regional Airport.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained the estimated cost of this project to be $125,213, with $112,213 being federal matching funds and local funds being $12,521.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comments, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B227-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B228-00     Approving Change Order No. 1; approving engineer's final report; levying and assessing special
                   assessments for the Grant Lane Improvement Project; appropriating funds.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that the final cost of the project was $693,477, most of which was funded through the one-quarter percent capital improvement sales tax. He reported the remaining $42,533 will be paid from tax bills levied against abutting property owners. Mr. Beck asked Mr. Patterson to explain the project and the special benefits accrued.
    Mr. Patterson explained that Grant Lane is designated as a collector street on the Major Thoroughfare Plan and extends from Scott Boulevard east and northward approximately 3,500 feet to connect with the north/south portion of Grant which was improved several years ago. Prior to improvements, the street consisted of a gravel and asphalt paved roadway approximately 20 to 22 feet in width with no sidewalks and open ditches on both sides. Mr. Patterson reported the street has been reconstructed to a 30 foot width with concrete pavement and curb and guttering. In addition, five foot wide sidewalks were constructed along both sides and set far enough back from the curb and guttering to allow for tree plantings along the entire length of the project.
    According to City policy for collector streets, Mr. Patterson explained that abutting property owners are subject to a tax bill equal to that of the cost of the curb and guttering or its equivalent. That maximum amount was set at the public hearing in February of 1999 to be $12.00 per foot. The rate being proposed tonight is based on actual construction costs which was $10.47 per foot. More than half of the properties along the project are through lots with front yard access on another street. The staff recommends those properties be assessed at the 50% reduction, or $5.24 per foot.
    Prior to levying the assessments, Mr. Patterson noted that Council must determine if there have been benefits to the property that are at least equal to the amount of the assessments being proposed. He suggested the Council consider the new curb and guttering along the entire length of the street has provided for improved storm water management, improved the appearance and maintainability of the properties, the sidewalks have provided for enhanced pedestrian safety in the area, and the improved street will eliminate dust problems and provide a smoother riding surface for the vehicle owners who use the street.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Keith Munson, 3806 Grant Lane, voiced his displeasure at being asked to pay another tax. He noted other residents of the City will also benefit from the road in addition to the abutting property owners. Mr. Munson reported that many trees were cut down and traffic in the area has increased considerably. He understood his bill was only for the cost of the curb and guttering, but he believed many people benefit from the road.
    Mayor Hindman pointed out that most of the cost of this project is being paid by those other people. Additionally, Mr. Campbell noted that had Grant Lane been a residential street, the cost of the tax bill would have been approximately $100 per abutting foot. Mr. Munson indicated he much preferred the rate of $10.47.
    Mr. John understood Mr. Munson has access onto Grant Lane. Mr. Munson said his driveway if just off of Grant Lane. Mr. Munson said he was not arguing the fact that most of the people being tax billed do not have access on to Grant Lane.
    Mr. Janku noted that most of us, when buying a house on a residential street, do pay the $100 per foot. He said this man lives on a collector street and everyone chipped in to help build the street, making his cost a lot less than that borne by most home owners buying a new home.
    Mr. Campbell commented that the residents in the area made a choice as to whether they wanted parking or a narrower street. He said they had chosen the narrower street. Mr. Campbell related that the City regrets that some trees had to be sacrificed for the project; however, Grant Lane has now been drastically improved.
    Mr. John found it hard to support any value or improvement to someone who has no access directly on to Grant Lane. He noted the Council amended the ordinance so that R-1 and R-2 lots could not have direct access on collector streets. However, these residents are now being billed for the curb on the back of the lot, which is of no extra value to them. Mr. John said they are getting no more benefit out of this than anyone else. In fact, because sidewalks are required on collector streets, he commented certain residents will have two sidewalks to shovel in the winter. Because of that policy, he believed projects such as this on collector streets should not be billed to the abutting property owners if the home owner does not have direct access to the street. Mr. John noted the increased storm water management will be a benefit to the entire neighborhood.
    Mr. Campbell said at one time he had made the argument that the City should not tax bill these properties at all because of the noise and other things that collector streets bring.
    Rob Burnscott, 3710 Bent Oak, explained that his property backs on to Grant Lane. He confirmed that he has no benefit to having a sidewalk in his backyard where before he had a nice hill with trees across it. Mr. Burnscott stated the trees that were cut down provided some protection from the traffic noise and lights.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    With respect to tree planting, Mayor Hindman said a lot of planning was done to allow for this to be a very pretty street in the future. He is proud of the staff for being farsighted enough to plan the street properly.
    Mr. Campbell noted that the road construction on Scott Boulevard is the cause for some of the increased traffic on Grant Lane.
    B228-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B229-00     Authorizing the repair and resurfacing of certain streets.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this program has been in effect for many years and provides for repairs to deteriorated streets that require more extensive maintenance than filling potholes and patching. All streets subject to this maintenance are unimproved streets and assessments made will not exceed $2.00 per lineal foot. This year the project includes 22 sections of street with the estimated cost being $63,388. Approximately $44,744 is expected to be recovered from tax bills with the remaining $18,644 being paid from the Street Division operating budget.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Linda Rootes, President of the North Central Columbia Neighborhood Association, thanked the Public Works staff for looking at the North Central neighborhood, particularly Fay Street. She said the street definitely needs work and recognized the staff for including it on the list.
    Jim German, 4217 Stevendave Drive, explained that he and his wife have three lots abutting this property acquired after 1970. He said they were assessed a tax bill on those tracts in 1987. Mr. German explained that he is opposed to this type of resurfacing because he felt it was only cosmetic and a temporary solution to a permanent problem.
    Mr. Janku explained the procedure where citizens can petition the upgrading of their street to improved standards. He suggested that the neighborhood meet with the staff in order to come up with some figures before signing a petition.
    Mr. German asked that they hold off on maintenance of Stevendave until his neighbors have voiced their opinions.
    Amanda Peplow, 4313 Stevendave Drive, asked if the resurfacing will take care of the street where the neighborhood children have piled up asphalt and ramped it for jumping over with their bikes. Mr. Patterson explained what was anticipated on Stevendave was leveling the rutted areas of broken pavement, but the final surface will be a seal coat -- oil with gravel aggregate on top of it. He indicated an excess level of gravel is placed on the first layer to keep the problem of tracking to a minimum. Mr. Patterson reported that after the gravel has had time to set and becomes embedded, any remaining loose gravel will be swept up.
    Ms. Peplow asked if the street was improved with curb and guttering, whether it would be torn up at a later date to allow for the installation of fire hydrants. Mr. Malon indicated his department always works with Public Works to try and get water mains installed before streets are paved, not after.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mr. Patterson said any street work would be postponed until the different areas have had sufficient time to determine whether or not they can get a petition together.
    B229-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B236-00     Authorizing construction of water main serving Heritage Estates, Plat 1; authorizing payment of
                   differential costs; appropriating funds.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained the current policy wherein if larger mains are determined to be necessary, the City pays for the differential costs. This project involves an eight inch pipe with the estimated cost to the City being $8,217.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comment, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    B236-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B259-00     Calling an election on local parks sales tax.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that earlier this year, Stephens College indicated they would sell their 111-acre lake property along Old 63 for $10 million to the City with the provision that the City must make a decision in regards to the purchase by this November. Following that announcement, the Trust for Public Land has been pursuing the possibility of the City purchasing the property for public use. Mr. Beck noted that the Trust for Public Land had a public opinion poll conducted which showed substantial local support for the property. He related that the opinion poll is available on the City's web site.
    Mr. Beck stated if the Council decides to move forward with the purchase of the property, he suggested that they also consider the land, development and maintenance costs, as well as financing charges that will be incurred by the purchase of the property. He reported that three alternatives for the use of the property were prepared and discussed publicly, but no plans were made. He pointed out that the purchase of the tract will require increasing maintenance and operations funding. Mr. Beck reported in order for the City to come up with the funding for the Stephens property, a ballot issue will be necessary. He commented that sales tax is one appropriate alternative for funding. He noted the City currently subsidizes the recreation services fund by $1.5 million per year and has a parks budget of about $8.2 million per year.
    Regarding the police budget, Mr. Beck indicated that staff has submitted requests for increasing the number of officers and neighborhood assistance personnel. He said substantial funding could be made available for other basic city operations, such as police, neighborhood assistance, and others, with the passage of a permanent park fund.
    Mr. Beck summarized the City's property/sales tax rates. He outlined the alternate funding plans being discussed. He said the Council introduced an ordinance on August 7, 2000, that provided for a 1/4% permanent parks sales tax that would yield about $3.5 million the first year with an estimated 3% per year increase. The staff prepared an amendment sheet to the bill to clarify an initial expenditure of funds should the Council decide to adopt any of the options. Two other alternatives were also prepared based on discussions with Council. One was for a 1/4% parks sales tax for 5 years followed by a 1/8% permanent sales tax. In that case, Mr. Beck said the 1/4% would yield 3.5 million per year and the 1/8% would yield $1.75 million per year after the fifth year. The third option was a 1/8% sales tax with a five year sunset and a 1/8% sales tax beginning at the same time. Mr. Beck reported if the City continues to acquire park land, such as the Stephens Lake property, an increase in basic revenues will be needed to fund development plans and maintenance costs that would follow any purchase.
    Mr. Beck related that if the Council adopts a 1/4% permanent parks tax (which would raise the sales tax rate from 6.975% to 7.225%), the City of Columbia would have the ninth highest sales tax rate in the state in comparison to other cities with a population over 10,000 -- 12 other cities would be in the same category. If the Council adopts the option of having a 1/4% permanent parks sales tax that is reduced to 1/8% after five years, the tax rate after five years would be 7.100% and Columbia would have the 21st highest sales tax rate in the state in comparison to other cities with a population over 10,000. There would be two other cities in that same category. Mr. Beck indicated the last option, the 1/8% - 1/8%, would be similar to the 1/4% - 1/8% as far as what percentages it amounts to and what the city ranking would be.
    Mayor Hindman commented that he intended to make a motion that the Council amend the bill to put a sunset on the 1/4% at the end of five years and then drop it down to 1/8%.
    Mr. Campbell noted discussions at the pre-Council dinner about a resolution being prepared that would specify how monies being redirected from what is now being used as a subsidy for parks and recreation operations could be used for other essential public services such as police, fire, etc. He noted this information could not be part of the ballot issue, but it would be coming along at a later time.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    Barbara Hoppe, 607 Bluff Dale, spokesperson for the Coalition to Save Stephens Lake and Parkland, presented the Council with a petition signed by 4,000 supporters who are in favor of preserving the lake. She asked people in support of the tax to stand. Approximately 150 people stood.
    Helen Smith, wife of Seymour Smith, former President of Stephens College, spoke in support of placing the permanent parks sales tax issue on the ballot. She was hopeful an amicable resolution could be reached between the City and the College.
    William Samuels, an attorney and Chair of Columbian's Against Unfair Taxes, said this issue is about a lot more than Stephens Lake. He believed all of the options being presented are for a permanent tax increase. Long after Stephens Lake has been bought and paid for, he said the tax will still be collected. He stated this proposal is for a tax increase with no specific purpose and no expiration date. Mr. Samuels said once a tax rate goes up, it never comes down. He noted that this method of taxation would also apply to groceries, which makes it a regressive and unfair tax falling on the middle class and the working poor. Mr. Samuels thought any taxes on the necessities of life were unfair to low income people. He theorized that a higher sales tax would only drive more income away.
    Devin Truebel, 1302 Ash, spoke on behalf of Heartwood, a non-profit organization. He noted that he is the nominee of the Green Party for US Congress this fall. He said Heartwood strongly endorsed the acquisition of the Stephens Lake property and leaving it as an undeveloped green space. If the land passes into public ownership, he suggested it be specified that it be left undeveloped green space in perpetuity. Mr. Truebel thought increasing property taxes would be a more progressive and a fairer way to pay for such acquisitions. He hoped the recommendation to secure adequate funding to get additional green spaces and to maintain their character in the future was accepted.
    Steven Wallace, 222 Calvin Drive and Dana Holly, 208 Calvin Drive, explained that they live next to the lake and they have spent lots of time playing on the property and fishing in the lake. They did not want to see it taken over by commercial developers.
    Larry Grossman, 3205 Westcreek Circle, indicated that he voted, with reservation, for the Community Recreation Center and that he favors the purchase of Stephens Lake as long as a reasonable price can be agreed upon. He explained that he does not oppose the purchase of park land, but noted there are too many priorities that are currently not funded, and in some areas, not even addressed. Serving on the I-70 Committee, Mr. Grossman commented that two points became very immediately obvious; it will be a decade or more before the City sees any relief from the state or federal government in regards to the traffic on I-70, and the main problem with I-70 through Columbia is caused by local traffic. Mr. Grossman believed this situation exists because the local governments have not done their job in creating east/west alternatives to the highway. He saw this as a crisis situation where people are dying because of government's inaction. Mr. Grossman commented there are higher priorities that need addressing. If he was given an opportunity to approve a one-time tax for Stephens Lake, he would enthusiastically do so, but he strongly urged the Council to separate the issues. Mr. Grossman indicated that he would not support a permanent tax at this time until the Council decides what the City's spending priorities should be. He urged the Council to separate the issues on the ballot so he could support the Stephens Lake property purchase.
    Thelma McArthur, 2 Miller Drive, spoke in favor of acquiring the property. She said user fees could be used to partially pay the debt.
    Fred Springsteel, 311 Longfellow Lane, suggested that the proposal be written to exclude food. If the tax did not exclude food, he would oppose it.
    Barbara Reed, 104 W. Lathrop Road, member of The Friends of Stephens Lake and The Coalition to Save Stephens Lake, said saving the lake is not just a matter of aesthetics, but of economics. She said it is vital to the inner city to keep Stephens Lake as a green space. Ms. Reed commented that people want to live next to a park, not to a commercial area or apartments.
    Speer Morgan, a resident of the East Campus neighborhood for over 20 years, stated it seemed obvious that this is a blessed opportunity for the area. He did not think the solution for funding the purchase was ideal, but he thought it was the right thing to do.
    Sue Bliss, spoke on behalf of the East Campus neighborhood. She believed the purchase of the Stephens property to be a once in a lifetime opportunity to preserve this last large open green space in the heart of the city. Especially today, Ms. Bliss said that people need parks and large expanses of serene green space and park land to counter-balance the fast pace of high tech society. She understood the controversy of how the property would be paid for, but Ms. Bliss also understood that a large portion of the tax will be raised by all the people that the Convention and Visitors Bureau are bringing into town. She had heard estimates about non-residents paying over 50% of Columbia's sales tax. Ms. Bliss encouraged the Council to move forward with a permanent parks tax.
    John Clark, 403 N. Ninth, spoke on behalf of the North Central Columbia Neighborhood Association. The neighborhood group supports the Coalition's position on the City acquiring the property for public use at a fair price. He said they support the need for more revenue with equal emphasis on acquisition of park land as well as maintenance of such.
    Dee Dokken, 208 Sanford, Stream Team 406, explained that this group has adopted a portion of Hinkson Creek, including the part that borders the Stephens property. The team is supportive of the acquisition of the Stephens property through the proposed parks sales tax. She thought the purchase could only help the recovery of Hinkson Creek.
    Jane Addison, 2407 Shepard, Green Belt Coalition of Mid-Missouri, said the Coalition supports the creation of a network of green linear corridors in and around Columbia. She said they are particularly happy with the idea of adding another park within the east side city limits. On behalf of the group, Ms. Addison urged the Council to look at all methods of acquiring park land green belt areas.
    Sherry Wyatt, 1002 Danforth, spoke on behalf of the Shepard Boulevard Neighborhood Association in support of acquiring the Stephens property. She urged the Council to let the citizens vote on the issue.
    Henry Lane, 1816 E. Broadway, spoke about Columbia's tax base and how that base is decreasing for the school district. Instead of the City buying the Stephens property, his suggestion was to work at getting the property into private hands where it would be subject to property taxes which would benefit the public schools.
    A. J. McRoberts, 1407 Bouchelle, said this is the first time since he has lived in Columbia that he has supported a tax issue. He did not think one-quarter of a cent would hurt anyone.
    Wilma Jordan, 1717 Amelia, felt if Stephens golf course is allowed to go into private hands it could be developed commercially. She asked that it become City property so it could remain green space.
    David Drum, 3405 Calumet, felt it conclusive that the community is supportive of the purchase of the property. He asked the Council to spend their time on coming up with a ballot issue that will receive widespread support.
    Grace Warren, 2303 Walnut, spoke in support of the purchase. She said this is the only area where she lives that residents can go sledding, swimming, or walking.
    Alyce Turner, 2194 E. Bearfield, spoke in support of the proposed parks tax. Ms. Turner explained that she is a member of the Boone County Visioning Committee. She said that the primary issue her group agreed upon is the need to preserve green space. She recommended that the Council consider a permanent land acquisition tax rather than including operating and maintenance expenses.
    Donna Kessel, 715 Lyon, spoke in support of getting the issue on the ballot. She indicated that she would rather have less to live on than to give up parks. She wanted to see an ongoing tax to fund further acquisition of parkland.
    Sue Forte, 627 Bluff Dale, spoke in support of the acquisition of the Stephens property.
    Susan Frank, 627 Bluff Dale, spoke in support of the issue.
    Michael Garrity, 2405 E. Walnut, spoke against commercialization of the property and in support of a tax increase for parks.
    Karl Skala, 5201 Gasconade, spoke on behalf of his wife and himself in favor of the acquisition. He thanked the Council for their efforts.
    Carolyn Matthews, 4200 Rock Quarry, asked everyone to keep traffic issues in mind if the property were to become commercial.
    Joe Bindbeutel, 1701 E. Gans Road, commented that parks are a necessity, not a nicety. He saw green space and aggressive long-term acquisition of green space and parks not as a cost to the community, but a benefit to the community that will ensure its long-term growth.
    John Grone, 1801 N. Route Z, said although he lives in the County he makes most of his major purchases and buys his groceries in Columbia. He asked that the lake property be preserved. However, he asked that the Council consider exempting food purchases from the tax increase.
    Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing.
    Mayor Hindman made the motion that B259-00 be amended by having the ballot language read as follows,

    The motion was seconded by Mr. Janku.
    Mr. Coffman spoke in support of Mayor Hindman's motion. He noted that when Columbia is listed as one of the best places to live, the City's parks and trails are always mentioned. If that is going to continue to be our strength, he believed the City needed to continue to plan ahead.
    Mr. John pointed out that there is no agreement with Stephens to purchase the property and asked what would happen if no agreement is reached between now and November and the ballot language specifically references the purchase of this property. He wondered what the City would be purchasing and at what price. Mr. John commented that many people have said they want to see the property acquired, but at a reasonable price. To specifically say that the City will purchase the property without knowing what the cost is, would basically lock us into whatever price the College wants to put on it. Mr. John suggested that there be two permanent 1/8% taxes - one for park land acquisitions and one for operations. He stated the City will need to acquire other park land in the future and did not think we should limit ourselves to just the Stephens Lake property. By not placing Stephens Lake, by name, on the ballot issue, he felt was the right thing to do because it may help in the negotiations between now and the election. Mr. John indicated if the College does not want to put a good price on it, so be it, there are other pieces of property that have been identified that could be acquired.
    Mayor Hindman indicated that he had also thought about the things Mr. John mentioned, but he is convinced that the true driving force behind this effort is a community desire to purchase Stephens Lake. He said whatever price the City agrees with, or not, is the price that will be voted on. If the issue is defeated, then the acquisition of the property will not happen.
    Mr. Campbell noted that with the amended language, "and for other park purposes", the parks tax will apply to things other than Stephens Lake. He said that wording would not tie it only to Stephens Lake property. Mr. Janku asked if the wording was "could be used" or "would be used". The language was "would". Mr. Campbell indicated the idea was to get some flexibility into it.
    Regarding the regressiveness of sales tax, Mr. Campbell remarked that he has long been concerned about it. On the other hand, voter approval at the polls have repeatedly shown this is the way people prefer to pay their taxes. If that is the way people want to do it, he believed that is what the Council should go along with. Mr. Campbell was also bothered about the price issue, but believed they, as the City Council, have an obligation to let the people make that decision. Mr. Campbell commented that he was bothered most about how to break the package up -- first thinking that two separate issues would be the way to go about it. He remarked that raised the question of what happens if one issue passes and the other fails. Since they are linked, Mr. Campbell felt it made sense to proceed with the amended language.
    Mrs. Crockett thought that the City should acquire the property, but it will be up to the voters to decide that. She noted the business community did not like the idea of a 1/8% tax with no sunset on it. She too, had a problem with naming Stephens Lake on the ballot, but she did not know how to get around it. Mrs. Crockett reported that 95% of the people speaking this evening live in the Stephens College area, but she believed the people living in south Columbia will not support it. She remarked a lot of details need to be ironed out between now and election day or she feared the issue would be defeated.
    Mr. Janku pointed out that if the City acquired the property and did not have the additional funds to maintain it, we would have to go to the general fund that pays for police, fire, and other things. He thought it is more responsible to link an ongoing fund for maintenance of the property being acquired. At pre-Council, Mr. Janku explained they discussed the need to clarify how an additional ongoing operation fund would be spent. He stated the City needs to spell out how this parks tax might free up money, what part of the tax would go toward acquisitions and what would go toward operations, etc. Mr. Janku suggested the Council keep working on this before the election.
    Mr. Janku thought the most troubling thing about this ballot issue is that they cannot present to the voters what the absolute price of the Stephens property will be. He noted the Council learned that there is an agreement to have the property appraised, and that an appraiser has been mutually selected between the College and the City. Mr. Janku believed if the price of the property is excessive, voters will not support the tax. He again asked about changing the wording from "would" to "could". It was decided to leave the language as proposed.
    Ms. Crayton remarked that she would like to see the price of the property negotiated down. If the price does not come down, she said the taxpayers will have to make the decision as to whether or not they want to pay that price.
    The motion to amend B259-00, made by Mayor Hindman, seconded by Mr. Janku, was approved by voice vote.
    Mr. John thought that the City is missing an opportunity by proposing a tax increase for just the acquisition of the Stephens property. He said it puts the City in the position of not having an ongoing, farsighted parks and green space acquisition plan. Dropping the tax to 1/8% after the property is acquired would basically put the City in the position of having enough money set aside to take care of operations, but not enough to acquire more land.
    Mrs. Crockett said she appreciated what Mr. John was saying, but said the people she was hearing from did not support the 1/8% extension.
    Mr. Campbell did not think the voters would support any more, especially if it was not for a very specific purpose. He believed people want to know what they are buying with their money.
    B259-00, as amended, was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, CAMPBELL, JOHN, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

(A)     Voluntary annexation of property located generally north of State Route K and southeast of Old Plank Road.
    Item A was read by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that an ordinance pertaining to this issue would be introduced later on the agenda.
    Mayor Hindman opened the public hearing.
    There being no comments, Mayor Hindman closed the public hearing and noted that no action was required at this point.
 

OLD BUSINESS
B230-00     Approving Amendment No. 1 to the agreement with Burns & McDonnell for design and construction
                   services related to the Wetland Treatment Unit Repair Project; appropriating funds.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck said this appropriation would provide for maintenance work on wetland units one, two and three. The estimated cost is $1,034,000, with the resident engineering costs being estimated at $130,900. He said the terms of the agreement had also been approved by DNR.
    B230-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B232-00     Amending Chapter 14 of the City Code to prohibit parking along the south side of Park Avenue
                   between Eighth Street and Rogers Street.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that complaints had been received about this 32-foot wide street where cars are unable to get through. He stated that Public Works surveyed the situation and recommended the removal of parking from the south side of the street.
    B232-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B238-00     Amending Chapter 27 of the Code to authorize the City Manager to enter into agreements to provide
                   specialized utility services to other cities, utilities or customers.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck asked Mr. Malon to describe this agreement.
    Mr. Malon explained this issue relates to his department's use of infrared thermography to look for hot spots, hot bushings, hot connectors, and that sort of thing during high load seasons. He indicated that Water and Light has received requests for this service from neighboring municipal utilities. Mr. Malon noted the equipment can be used to provide preventative maintenance reports so problems can be repaired during convenient times to avoid extended outages in substations, transformers, etc. He pointed out that this service does not fit very well into a mutual aid type category as mutual aid agreements are only extended in times of emergency when assistance is needed immediately. After discussions with the legal department, it was believed that a different type of agreement would be appropriate wherein the City would provide a service at a fee that will cover our costs. Mr. Malon reported this agreement would provide a method for the City Manager to enter into those kinds of agreements.
    Waldo Palmer, 414 Alexander, said although he trusts the City Manager, he felt any agreement that involves City money should be approved by the Council. He did not think that the Council should designate someone who is not elected to spend City funds.
    Mr. Boeckmann explained that the Council only approves a small percentage of contracts that the City enters into. He further explained that this particular contract is not a purchasing contract, and that most of those types of agreements go through Purchasing rather than through the City Council. He pointed out that Purchasing agreements are authorized by the City Council by the adoption of Chapter 2 of the Code of Ordinances, and added that only appropriated funds can be spent by the City staff through the Purchasing Division. In this case, the Water and Light staff will be authorized to provide services to other utilities so the City will be receiving money, not paying it. Mr. Boeckmann indicated whatever services the Water and Light utility would provide to others would be reimbursed for at least the amount of the actual cost.
    B238-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B247-00     Authorizing an annexation agreement with Tony J. and Shellie J. Spaedy.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Under the Council's policy, Mr. Beck explained that a pre-annexation agreement is required when someone wants to connect to City sewer when the property is located outside the City limits. This would authorize the approval of such.
    B247-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B248-00     Granting a sidewalk variance to the Subdivision Regulations along the north side of Opal Drive, west
                   of Wyatt Lane.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck noted that this request had been recommended for denial by both staff and the Planning and Zoning Commission.
    Bill Marshall, 3208 Lynnwood, project engineer, noted the proposed sidewalk would be adjacent to a piece of property which cannot be developed located on the north side of Opal. He said the applicant is willing to substitute the required sidewalk on the north side of the property for a six foot wide sidewalk on the south side. It was thought a walk in that location would better accommodate movement of pedestrians.
    B248-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: NO ONE. VOTING NO: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill defeated.
 

B249-00     Appropriating funds for the Flat Branch Development Project.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained that this would appropriate money raised by the Trailhead Committee in the amount of $36,900 and a storm water grant from DNR in the amount of $90,000.
    B249-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B252-00     Authorizing a lease agreement with option to purchase with Greenwing Development, LLC.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    In a previous ballot issue, Mr. Beck explained that the City was to set aside funds for a neighborhood park in the area around the Smithton Middle School. At one point it was thought some green space adjacent to the school could be acquired, but currently the School Board has indicated that property needs to be retained so it might be used for future expansion of the school.
    Mr. Beck reported this ordinance would approve a revised agreement between the City and Greenwing Development for the lease/purchase of six acres of land located north of Smithton Middle School for a neighborhood park. He noted the first agreement called for the property owned by Greenwing to be subdivided into four lots, two of which would be acquired by the City and the remaining two would be offered to a church. He stated the City had the responsibility of having the property platted. Mr. Beck explained the agreement was not finalized because of Greenwing's concern with requirements relating to the subdividing process for provision of sewers, sidewalks, etc. This amended agreement clarifies responsibilities for meeting subdivision requirements should required variances not be approved. Mr. Beck stated the revision also stipulates that the Council will accept a performance contract from the Church.
    B252-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

B255-00     Authorizing an agreement with American Legion Herbert Williams Post 202 for donation of parkland
                   and annexation of the Legion property.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Mr. Beck explained for many years the community has benefitted from the American Legion's generosity in utilizing a portion of their property at no cost. He indicated the Legion is now willing to deed over 16.5 acres to the City without charge. He noted the City will be working on bringing a sewer line to the area and this property will be annexed into the City so the Legion can have access to that line. Mr. Beck remarked this will eliminate both the septic tank and temporary facilities in the area. The cost of this sewer project will be approximately $114,000.
    Mr. Beck reported the Legion will retain the three acres where their buildings are contained and the City will be given first option to purchase the remaining property at a later date. He pointed out that the City will be given the opportunity to actually own the ballfields that have been provided free of charge for a number of years.
    Carl Niewoehner, 7205 N. Oakland Gravel, Chair of the Board of Directors of the American Legion Post 202, said the Post has had a wonderful relationship with the City over the years and he was grateful for everything that has been to accommodate this request. Mr. Niewoehner remarked that the Legion wanted to ensure that this wonderful park would go to the City.
    B255-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:

B258-00     Appropriating hotel/motel tax funds for the Boone County Heritage Festival and the Columbia Fall
                   Festival of the Arts.
    The bill was given second reading by the Clerk.
    Lorah Steiner explained that $16,000 was appropriated in this year's budget to support festivals and events that occurred in this fiscal year yet were still not eligible for the new funding. She commented these are the final two events of the four to be funded this year.
    B258-00 was given third reading with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bill declared enacted, reading as follows:
 

CONSENT AGENDA
    The following bills were given second reading and the resolutions were read by the Clerk.

B231-00     Amending Chapter 14 of the City Code to restrict parking for sections of Coats Street, Eighth Street
                   and Stewart Road.
B233-00     Authorizing right of use permit with Williams Communications, Inc. to install underground
                   telecommunications system under Falling Leaf Lane and Falling Leaf Court rights-of-way.
B234-00     Authorizing financial assistance agreements with the Mid-Missouri Solid Waste District; appropriating
                   funds.
B235-00     Accepting easements and quit claim deeds for sewer, drainage, electric and water purposes.
B237-00     Approving engineer's final report; accepting a deed of dedication; authorizing payment of differential
                   costs for water main serving Vanderveen Crossing, Plat 3.
B239-00     Accepting easements and deed of dedications for water, electric, sewer and utility purposes.
B240-00     Appropriating funds for COLT car hire charges.
B241-00     Vacating an electric easement.
B242-00     Vacating an electric easement located within Woodrail Subdivision, Plat No. 7; accepting a grant of
                   easement for electric purposes.
B243-00     Vacating a portion of a street easement for Brown School Road; accepting a grant of easement for
                   street purposes.
B244-00     Vacating a portion of a sewer easement located within Cambridge Place Subdivision.
B245-00     Approving the replat of Cambridge Place Subdivision; authorizing a performance contract.
B246-00     Approving the final plat of Curtright Subdivision; authorizing a performance contract.
B250-00     Appropriating funds for the Fourth and Cherry Clean-up Project.
B251-00     Appropriating funds for the Memorial Tree and Bench Program.
B253-00     Levying and assessing special tax bills for abatement of weed nuisances.
B254-00     Authorizing an agreement with the Missouri Department of Health for the Home Visiting Program;
                   appropriating funds.
B256-00     Renewing the Temporary Revocable Utility Permit granted to Digital Teleport, Inc.
B257-00     Authorizing an antenna agreement with VoiceStream PCS II Corporation for lease of space on the
                   Walnut Street water tower.
R166-00     Setting a public hearing: water main along Parklawn Court, Texas Avenue, Sondra Avenue and Doris
                   Drive.
R167-00     Setting a public hearing: Columbia Special Business District FY 2001 Budget.
R168-00     Renewing an agreement with the Missouri Department of Health for the Breast and Cervical Cancer
                   Program.
R169-00     Renewing an agreement with the Missouri Department of Health for the Sexually Transmitted Disease
                   Clinical Services Program.
R170-00     Renewing an agreement with the Missouri Department of Health for day care inspections.

    The bills were given third reading and the resolutions were read with the vote recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Bills declared enacted and resolutions declared adopted, reading as follows:
 

NEW BUSINESS
R171-00     Approving the preliminary plat of Deer Ridge Subdivision.
    The resolution was read by the Clerk.
    Mr. Dudark pointed out that this plat is located in the northeast part of town and contains 147 lots, three of which will be park and open space lots for private use and the remainder will be single family lots. The Planning and Zoning Commission recommended approval of the request with two conditions. The first condition is to reduce the width of the center north/south street from a collector to a residential width with some traffic calming included in the construction plans. Mr. Dudark reported the second condition is to identify a public pedestrian easement across the lot that connects Button Buck Circle with Black Tail Drive. He noted this is a private park site that would allow public use across the private parkland.
    Bill Marshall, President of Marshall Engineering Surveying, Inc., offered to answer any questions.
    Mr. Janku indicated his appreciation that traffic calming devices had been incorporated into the actual subdivision design.
    The vote on R171-00 was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:
 

R172-00     Reappointing John Whiteside Municipal Judge.
    The resolution was read by the Clerk.
    At the request of the Council, Mr. Beck explained this legislation would reappoint the Judge to another four year term beginning October 8, 2000.
    The vote on R172-00 was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:
 

R173-00     Selecting an artist for the Community Recreation Center; authorizing an agreement with Norman
                   Courtney for art work for the Recreation Center.
    The resolution was read by the Clerk.
    Dave Griggs, Chair of the Commission on Cultural Affairs, said the Standing Committee on Public Art is again honored to be involved in another Percent for Art Project. After assessing the process of selecting a work of art, he explained that the Office of Cultural Affairs assisted the Standing Committee on Public Art in refining the steps to be taken for the project at the Community Recreation Center. Mr. Griggs noted that this time the Committee selected and searched for an artist, not a work of art. The intent was to involve the artist in the overall design process so his work will truly be integrated into the building.
    Mr. Griggs explained the selection process the Committee went through and noted that 33 applications were received. After choosing three artists out of that number, these individuals were invited to Columbia for an interview in July. Each of the artists gave a short slide presentation of his work after which the committee asked a set number of pre-determined questions. Mr. Griggs remarked that once the interviews were completed, the Committee discussed the merits of each applicant and agreed on Norman Courtney as their selection. The Committee forwarded this recommendation to the Commission on Cultural Affairs which was unanimously accepted. Mr. Griggs presented a short video of Mr. Courtney's interview to the Council.
    Mayor Hindman thanked the Committee and Commission for all of their work on the issue.
    Mr. Janku complimented the Commission's approach on selecting the artist.
    The vote on R173-00 was recorded as follows: VOTING YES: HINDMAN, CRAYTON, JANKU, CROCKETT, COFFMAN. VOTING NO: NO ONE. ABSENT: CAMPBELL, JOHN. Resolution declared adopted, reading as follows:
 

The following bills were introduced by the Mayor, unless otherwise indicated, and all were given first reading:

B260-00     Amending Chapter 2 of the Code to reestablish a procedure to disclose potential conflicts of interest.
B261-00     Conveying Southmark Development, Inc. property to the City; authorizing dissolution of Southmark
                   Development, Inc.
B262-00     Authorizing an amendment to the agreement with Sverdrup Facilities to include the design of the larger
                   version of the Community Recreation Center.
B263-00     Authorizing the installation of water main along Parklawn Court, Texas Avenue, Sondra Avenue and
                   Doris Drive.
B264-00     Amending Chapter 14 of the Code to prohibit parking along the south side of Calvert Drive.
B265-00     Confirming the contract of Don Schnieders Excavating Company for the construction of the Bear Creek
                   Trail Phase I Bridge project.
B266-00     Amending Chapter 22 of the Code relating to refuse collection.
B267-00     Authorizing the acquisition of land necessary to construct Smith Drive from Windermere Drive west
                   1,600 feet.
B268-00     Authorizing an agreement with the Missouri Highway and Transportation Commission for funding
                   associated with the construction of the Garth Avenue bridge over Bear Creek.
B269-00     Authorizing a right of use permit with the University of Missouri to install a sewer line in a public
                   easement on Parkade Boulevard.
B270-00     Authorizing change orders to the contract with Prost Builders, Inc. for the renovation of the Armory
                   Building.
B271-00     Voluntary annexation of property located generally north of State Route K and southeast of Old Plank
                   Road.
B272-00     Rezoning property located on the south side of Smiley Lane, approximately 1,000 feet west of
                   Rangeline Street from District C-3 to District R-1.
B273-00     Vacating sanitary sewer easements located within McKee Estates, Plat No. 1.
B274-00     Approving the final plat of McKee Estates, Plat No. 1; authorizing a performance contract.
B275-00     Approving the final plat of Frank C. Barnes Subdivision, Plat 1; granting a variance from the
                   Subdivision Regulations; authorizing a performance contract.
B276-00     Approving the Bearfield Meadows PUD Site Plan; granting a variance to the Subdivision Regulations.
B277-00     Accepting easements for utility purposes.
B278-00     Authorizing the Cedar Oak Mobile Home Park to resell city water to the tenants of the mobile home
                   park.
B279-00     Authorizing antenna agreements with various communications companies for lease of space on the
                   Shepard water tower.
B280-00     Accepting a Law Enforcement Block Grant; appropriating funds.
B281-00     Amending Chapter 20 of the Code to establish Planning Department processing fees; amending
                   Chapter 29 of the Code relating to the processing fee for rezoning requests.
B282-00     Amending Chapter 27 of the City Code relating to water services size and installation fees.
B283-00     Amending Chapter 15 of the Code as it relates to warrant fees.
B284-00     Amending Chapter 5 of the City Code as it relates to animal control services fees.
B285-00     Amending Chapter 11 of the City Code as it relates to fees for public health services.
B286-00     Establishing Parks and Recreation fees.
B287-00     Amending Chapter 6 and 22 of the Code relating to fees of rental unit inspections and sign permits.
B288-00     Adopting the Columbia Special Business District FY 2001 Budget.
 

REPORTS AND PETITIONS
A)     Intra-Departmental Transfer of Funds
    Report accepted.
 

B)     Proposed Outdoor Lighting Ordinance
    It was decided that a work session was in order for discussion of this issue.
 

C)     Dexheimer Shelter Relocation
    Before relocating the shelter, Mr. Beck indicated that staff thought Council should be informed of their plans. He noted that sketches of the proposed relocation were sent to the Council. He asked Mr. Hood when the project would begin. Mr. Hood replied that staff would like to begin construction this fall if the Council is comfortable with the new location being suggested.
    Mayor Hindman felt the reasons for moving the shelter were good ones; but said he did not want this being interpreted as Council consent to giving up park land in order to move the highway or to allow development of land across the street.
    Mayor Hindman made the motion that the Council approve the relocation. The motion was seconded by Mr. Janku and approved unanimously by voice vote.
 

BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS
    Upon receiving the majority vote of the Council, the following individuals were appointed to the following boards and commissions:

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION CODES COMMISSION
Lichty, Curt, 501 W. Hickam Drive, County - term to expire 8/1/03

CULTURAL AFFAIRS COMMISSION
Downey, James T., 3301 Greenridge, Ward 3 - term to expire 4/1/02

DISABILITIES COMMISSION
Ehrlich, Matthew, S., 611A Claudell Lane, Ward 1 - term to expire 6/15/03

BOARD OF HEALTH
Szewczyk, Michael J., 1404 Highlands Ct., Ward 5 - term to expire 8/31/03

HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION
Sheals, Debbie O., 406 W. Broadway, Ward 4 - term to expire 9/1/03 (expertise)
Silverman, David S., 304 Sanford Avenue, Ward 1 - term to expire 9/1/03 (other)
 

COMMENTS OF COUNCIL, STAFF, AND PUBLIC
    Mrs. Crockett asked about two Planning and Zoning Commissioners attending a meeting in Chicago on low income housing. She asked if funds would be available for them to attend the meeting in November. Mr. Janku suggested it come out of the Planning Department budget. Typically, Mr. Beck said the Commission would work out a plan. He said if there is no money in their account, a transfer would have to be worked out. Mr. Beck remarked that the Commission should request the funds.
    Mrs. Crockett made the motion that the Commission be accommodated as best as can be with the money available. The motion was seconded by Mr. Janku and approved unanimously by voice vote.
    Mr. Janku suggested that the procedure be clarified so people understand how to go about requesting such things. Mr. Coffman asked that each Commission be informed as to what they need to do regarding travel issues.
    Mr. Coffman announced that the local natural gas company has asked for a rate increase and the Public Service Commission has been good enough to hold a public hearing to receive public comment. The meeting will be held the evening of August 28, at the Charters Lecture Hall on the Stephens College Campus, 1405 E. Broadway, at 6:30 p.m.
    Ms. Crayton commented that she has been asked by several people why the Douglass Pool closes earlier than other City pools. Mr. Hood explained that the basic problem this time of year is staffing the pools. He said most of the lifeguards are high school or college students and they begin losing staff about a week before classes begin. Mr. Hood reported that because attendance is higher at Oakland and Twin Lakes, those are the two facilities they try to keep open. He noted that this year they were very close to not even being able to keep Twin Lakes open. Mr. Hood commented that this would not be a problem if the City could keep enough certified lifeguards on board. He explained that every year his department offers classes in lifeguarding and lifeguard certification. Ms. Crayton said she would try to send some people his way. Mr. Hood offered to send Ms. Crayton information on the schedule for upcoming classes.
    Mr. Janku commented that he had been forwarded information about a new program the state has developed relating to tax credits for rehabilitation of homes in certain areas. He noted that some areas in Columbia are eligible. He gave this information to Mr. Beck and asked that staff look into the possibility of participating.
    Mr. Janku explained that one community has developed the equivalent of our Adopt-a-Spot for public art works. He suggested that staff review this issue.
    Mr. Janku noted that in 1937 the City purchased the land on which Ellis Fischel Cancer Center now resides. He stated the City paid $20,000 for the 40-acre tract. He asked if it was still under City ownership.
    Mayor Hindman said the Bicycle/Pedestrian Commission and the Mayor's Council on Physical Fitness and Health have asked if they could be staffed. He said the Planning Department would seem to be involved with the Bicycle/Pedestrian Commission. He suggested Mitch Skov as the logical person to do the staffing. Mr. Hood said Parks and Recreation is currently staffing the Mayor's Council on Physical Fitness and Health. He added that Gary Ristow has regularly been attending their meetings. Mayor Hindman thought perhaps the group believed that Mr. Ristow was just a member. He asked that the matter be straightened out.
    Mayor Hindman commented that he still thought the City should be working on a grant writer program. He was told by John Ott that Rocheport had a grant writer. He noted that this individual was not paid by the City, but paid a percentage of the grant.
    Karl Skala, 5201 Gasconade, as a member of the Energy and Environment Commission and Chair of the commercial lighting subcommittee, availed himself to answer any questions regarding the report that was submitted to the Council. He said he and members of the Commission or subcommittee would be more than happy to attend the work session on the lighting issue.
    Henry Lane, 1816 E. Broadway, reported that the Library building is in the process of being gutted. He listed many things that are being taken to the city landfill instead of being recycled or sold. Mr. Lane asked the Mayor to use any influence he may have to get the Library Board to realize this is tax payer money that is being thrown away. Mayor Hindman said he would look into it.
    The meeting adjourned at 11:55 p.m.

                                                                                        Respectfully submitted,

                                                                                        Penny St. Romaine
                                                                                        City Clerk